Forum dyskusyjne miłośników twórczości J.R.R. Tolkiena
w sieci od 11/2001
 
Gospoda(1) | Zasady Forum | FAQ | Szukaj | Kalendarz |  Zarejestruj się |  Profil | Zaloguj się, by sprawdzić wiadomości | Zaloguj

Witryny zrzeszone w forum:
Hobbiton  Pod Rozbrykanym Balrogiem


"Tuor stanął na szczycie skały i rozłożył szeroko ramiona. Jego serce wypełniła ogromna tęsknota, powiadają, że był on pierwszym z Ludzi, który dotarł do Wielkiego Morza i nikt, poza samymi Eldarami nie czuł na widok jego fal głębszej tęsknoty." , Niedokończone Opowieści


Temat: Beowulf - zamiast recenzji (Strona 1 z 3)

Idź do strony 1, 2, 3  Następna
  skocz na koniec strony
Napisz nowy temat   Odpowiedz do tematu    Forum tolkienowskie -> Tolkienistyka i Posttolkienistyka Wydruk
Zobacz poprzedni temat :: Zobacz następny temat  
Autor Wiadomość
Lomendil
Strażnik Północy


Dołączył(a): 17 Cze 2006
Wpisy: 776

Nieobecny(a): in tenebris

Wysłany: 30-05-2014 11:14    Temat wpisu: Beowulf - zamiast recenzji Odpowiedz z cytatem Szukaj na forum

Poniżej uwagi Stuarta Lee (o jego książce o Tolkienie kiedyś wspominałem), dotyczące Tolkiena przekładu "Beowulfa", z listy dyskusyjnej anglosaksonistów:

Cytat:
We have just started a small reading group at Oxford on Tolkien's translation. Interesting mixture of philologists and literary people (medieval and Tolkien) wading through the book. At our first meeting discussions ranged from the first word (Uśmiech), to the archaic (or not) syntax of the translation, the rhythm within the prose and how occasionally it was attempting to match the OE, Beow not Beowulf, Tolkien's views on Geats and Jutes, and a further insight into 'barrow-wights'. Quite a lot there and one also has to consider this as a teacher of OE - presumably this is the translation students will read independently from now on in (or at least first off) which comes with pitfalls.

Our main annoyance was the lack of information (dates, MSS) of the source
for the commentary. You have to kind of guess dates from what is said
(clearly some post-dates the major discoveries at Sutton Hoo for example)
or the provenance based on a reasonable knowledge of Tolkien's unpublished
manuscripts.

_________________
Friends help you move. Real friends help you move bodies.
Powrót do góry
 
 
Lomendil
Strażnik Północy


Dołączył(a): 17 Cze 2006
Wpisy: 776

Nieobecny(a): in tenebris

Wysłany: 30-05-2014 19:09    Temat wpisu: Odpowiedz z cytatem Szukaj na forum

A tu recenzja Johna Gartha z "New Statesman":

Cytat:
In his story “Leaf by Niggle”, J R R Tolkien imagines an artist painting a picture he can neither complete nor abandon. “It had begun with a leaf caught in the wind, and it became a tree; and the tree grew, sending out innumerable branches, and thrusting out the most fantastic roots.” In the end the picture is never put on show.

The metaphor captures the scale and gorgeous impracticality of Tolkien’s writing but not its fate. Most of his “tree” has been saved and his posthumous titles outnumber those published in his lifetime by roughly three to one. In this latest book, a deep root is exposed: his work on the Old English poem Beowulf. The surprise is how “fantastic” the root turns out to be, twisting thirstily through the scholarly subsoil to tap the groundwater of a forgotten folk tale – or “fairy story”, as Tolkien prefers to call it.

The poem, written down around 1000AD, mixes fiction with 5th- and 6th-century history. Beowulf sails from his Geatish homeland in Sweden to defeat Grendel, an ogre who has usurped the Danish feast hall of King Hrothgar. Beowulf then hunts down Grendel’s vengeful mother, but in old age, now king of the Geats, he slays and is slain by a dragon. In his 1936 lecture “Beowulf : the Monsters and the Critics”, Tolkien insisted that the poem is not just a mine for historical data into which some fantastical monsters have inconveniently strayed but a work of art in which the monsters are foils for an entire cultural attitude to life, death and courage.

The literary landscape has changed since then in a way that Tolkien would have neither expected nor accepted: he now towers in fame over Beowulf. Last year, Penguin repackaged its Michael Alexander translation as one of five “classic [stories] that inspired J R R Tolkien’s The Hobbit”.

Tolkien’s prose translation has been edited by his long-serving son Christopher, now 89, from versions dating back to 1926 (regrettably omitting an earlier, unfinished verse translation). A large, nuggety selection from Tolkien’s lectures, presented by way of commentary, ranges from semantics to genealogy, from the giants of Genesis to the Germanic concept of fate. Also included are two short, lapidary pieces of creative writing, “Sellic Spell” and “The Lay of Beowulf”. All this illuminates the poem but far more people will read the book for Tolkien’s sake than for Beowulf’s. That is fair enough.

Tolkien was studying Beowulf deeply when the First World War broke out and by the time he went off to fight in the battle of the Somme, in the summer of 1916, he had begun to map out his vision of Middle-earth. The folk narrative of an individual battling through fear or horror, experiencing loss and new-springing hope, must have chimed with his experiences on the Western Front: his enthusiasm for fairy stories was, he wrote, “quickened to full life by war”. Born out of the cataclysm of conflict, Middle-earth has since become a mirror to the modern world. Yet only Tolkien’s brilliance in inhabiting the early-medieval Germanic mindset could have produced it.

In Beowulf, we see the lordly custom of giving rings to retainers, which Tolkien subverts with Sauron, his own “lord of the rings”. We encounter Hrothgar’s golden hall, the model for Théoden’s. In the night-haunting, man-eating Grendel, we may recognise Gollum magnified; the dragon is a prototype for Smaug. For some, the world of Beowulf and Middle-earth were elided in Tolkien’s lectures: W H Auden once wrote to tell him “what an unforgettable experience it was for me as an undergraduate, hearing you recite Beowulf. The voice was the voice of Gandalf.”

Tolkien, an obsessive niggler with too many projects to fit in one lifespan, would have needed a hard push, from a publisher and perhaps from a strong-armed friend such as C S Lewis, to finalise and publish his prose translation. The version that survives, though, is far from prosaic. He cannot conceal the strangeness of the underlying idiom but his cadence is commanding and his language evocative: “He came now from the moor under misty fells, Grendel walking. The wrath of God was on him.”

Much syntactic inversion yields not promptly to grasp of mind – but few will be surprised to see archaisms such as “Lo!” and “smote”. This reflects Tolkien’s view that the poet wrote in a register already venerable in 1000AD. With kennings – metaphorical Old English compounds of words – he is more expansive than most. What Seamus Heaney in his 1999 translation gives as “the whale-road”, Tolkien, who argues that rád did not mean “road” but the act of riding, unpacks as “the sea where the whale rides” (his commentary expands the image: “watery fields where you can see dolphins . . . seeming to gallop like a line of riders on the plains”). Students may prefer Tolkien for accuracy and fans will snap his book up but it won’t convert admirers of Heaney’s poetic latitude.

The commentary shows Tolkien’s curiosity about the threshold between myth and reality. Hrothgar’s ancestor Scyld “came out of the Unknown beyond the Great Sea and returned into it: a miraculous intrusion into history”, he writes. Hrothgar’s court at Heorot, which once really existed near Roskilde, Denmark, becomes in Beowulf a scene of superhuman marvels, like Camelot. And in his aspect as “the bear-man, the giant-killer”, whose hands have the strength of 30 men, Beowulf comes directly from fairy story.

“Sellic Spell” means “a tale of wonder” and Tolkien’s experimental story strips away Beowulf’s historical aspect to expose the even older fairy story he discerned at its heart. The hero, Beewolf (a kenning for “bear”, named the “bee wolf” for its plundering of hives), heads to the Golden Hall with two companions who first try their magic powers against Grinder (Grendel). This story is the gem in the book. Only its disconnection from Middle-earth can explain why it has remained hidden so long.

Yet it is not truly disconnected. Like “Sellic Spell”, Tolkien’s Middle-earth oeuvre began as an attempt to imagine the “lost tales” behind the scattered fragments of medieval literature. It was a hunger that scholarship alone could not fully satisfy. Tolkien’s view of Beowulf as a marriage of fairy story and history explains his rationale in constructing for his own grand fairy story a world so convincing in its “historical” detail that many feel they have been there.


Link: http://www.newstatesman.com/culture/2014/05/j-r-r-tolkien-beowulf-one-m ans-passion-threshold-between-myth-and-reality

_________________
Friends help you move. Real friends help you move bodies.
Powrót do góry
 
 
M.L.
Uprzedzony, ujadający krzykacz / Administrator


Dołączył(a): 27 Cze 2002
Wpisy: 5674
Skąd: Mafiogród


Wysłany: 01-06-2014 07:53    Temat wpisu: Odpowiedz z cytatem Szukaj na forum

Czyli, jeżeli dobrze rozumiem, nie mamy w tym wypadku do czynienia z tłumaczeniem poematu w klasycznym tego słowa rozumieniu. Redekor/redaktorzy zamieścił tu tłumaczenie prozatorskie, które jest pretekstem do zawarcia rozbudowanych komentarzy Tolkiena odnośnie Beowulfa. Do tego mamy różne dodatki. Według Gartha więc jest to bardziej Tolkien i niż Beowulf . Hmmm, to możenie mam racji z tym tłumaczeniem. hmmmm... Język
_________________
ēl sīla lūmena vomentienguo wieeeeeeeeeelgachny uśmiech
---------------------------------------
For the grace, for the might of our Lord
For the home of the holy
For the faith, for the way of the sword
Powrót do góry
 
 
Lomendil
Strażnik Północy


Dołączył(a): 17 Cze 2006
Wpisy: 776

Nieobecny(a): in tenebris

Wysłany: 02-06-2014 12:36    Temat wpisu: Odpowiedz z cytatem Szukaj na forum

Mam od kilkunastu minut "Beowulfa". Książka naprawdę ładnie wydana, przyjemnie wziąć do ręki. Co w środku?

Przekład "Beowulfa" prozą, strony 13-105. Komentarz, strony 137-353. Raczej będzie ciekawy dla osób z pewną znajomością tematu, zwykły czytelnik, nawet zainteresowany "Beowulfem", może uznać go miejscami za zbyt specjalistyczny.
"Sellic Spell" jest w dwóch wersjach, angielskiej i staroangielskiej, do tej drugiej nie ma przekładu, jak podkreśla Christopher, więc nie są to chyba wersje identyczne. Na tylnej okładce jest rysunek 'bagna' Grendela, ten sam, co w "JRR Tolkien. Author and Illustrator". Tyle, póki co.

Aha, ja bym jednak nie mówił, że to nie jest tłumaczenie, w końcu prozą można wiersz przetłumaczyć, po polsku mamy "Odyseję" prozą, pióra Parandowskiego, przekład generalnie wierny, poza jakimiś drobiazgami w doborze słownictwa czy opuszczeniem trudnego wersu. Szkoda, oczywiście, że nie dano nam chociażby tych fragmentów tłumaczenia wierszem, które Tolkien zrobił.

_________________
Friends help you move. Real friends help you move bodies.
Powrót do góry
 
 
Lomendil
Strażnik Północy


Dołączył(a): 17 Cze 2006
Wpisy: 776

Nieobecny(a): in tenebris

Wysłany: 03-06-2014 08:11    Temat wpisu: Odpowiedz z cytatem Szukaj na forum

Przeczytałem "Sellic Spell", nie powiem, żeby mnie zachwyciło, może dlatego, że jest zbyt schematyczne baśniowo: trzech bohaterów, z których sukces odnosi ten najmłodszy i najmniej poważany, trochę jak w baśniach, gdzie występują trzej synowie króla lub gospodarza, z których najmłodszy (i najgłupszy) wygrywa. Za to przekład i komentarz są wspaniałe, obezwładniające językiem i szerokością spojrzenia. Ciekawym, co Tolkien zrobił z kruksami, tzn. z miejscami szczególnie trudnymi i nie do końca zrozumiałymi, jest kilka takich w "Beowulfie".
_________________
Friends help you move. Real friends help you move bodies.
Powrót do góry
 
 
M.L.
Uprzedzony, ujadający krzykacz / Administrator


Dołączył(a): 27 Cze 2002
Wpisy: 5674
Skąd: Mafiogród


Wysłany: 04-06-2014 05:59    Temat wpisu: Odpowiedz z cytatem Szukaj na forum

Lómendilu pytanie jest w taki przypadku proste. Czy twoim zdaniem jest sens tłumaczyć ten tekst na polski i dlaczego tak lub nie? Rozmowy z osobami, które już mają orygionał skłaniają mnie do tego, że ze względu na bardzo rozbudowane komentarze jednak warto. Ale to nie znaczy, że nie mam wątpliwości, przeciwnie mam ich legion.
_________________
ēl sīla lūmena vomentienguo wieeeeeeeeeelgachny uśmiech
---------------------------------------
For the grace, for the might of our Lord
For the home of the holy
For the faith, for the way of the sword
Powrót do góry
 
 
Lomendil
Strażnik Północy


Dołączył(a): 17 Cze 2006
Wpisy: 776

Nieobecny(a): in tenebris

Wysłany: 04-06-2014 13:35    Temat wpisu: Odpowiedz z cytatem Szukaj na forum

Komentarze z pewnością zasługują na przekład, pytanie tylko, jakich znajdą odbiorców: ilu czytelników będzie zainteresowanych informacją, że w tym miejscu taki a taki czasownik ma znaczenie przechodnie? hmmmm... W każdym razie, nie wszystko w komentarzach zaciekawi "zwykłego" odbiorcę, to rzecz pewna.

Co do przekładu: jestem przeciwnikiem tłumaczenia z przekładu. Na przykładzie: Ursula Le Guin przetłumaczyła, czy może raczej sparafrazowała - na angielski - "Tao Te Jing". Mam ten przekład, jest ciekawy, wynika z jej wieloletniego obcowania z tekstem w wydaniu interlinearnym, i z innymi przekładami anglojęzycznymi. Wiem, że ten przekład-parafrazę Le Guin wydano po polsku - po co? Tłumaczymy, czyli w pewien sposób interpretujemy, czyjąś interpretację; to może być ciekawe co najwyżej dla osób, które mogą obcować z oryginałem, chociaż one też raczej zadowolą się tłumaczeniem, a nie tłumaczeniem tłumaczenia. Czy byłby sens tłumaczyć np. "Hobbita" z hiszpańskiego przekładu na polski? To taka sama sytuacja. W przypadku "Beowulfa" nie odda się na polski różnych zabiegów Tolkiena, związanych z rytmem, akcentowaniem czy nawet archaizacją pewnych słów, jakikolwiek więc walor estetyczny zniknie, a dla poznania samego "Beowulfa" lepiej już przeczytać jakiś przekład z pierwszej ręki.

Jeszcze zwrócę uwagę na wiersz już samego Tolkiena, "The Lay of Beowulf", w dwóch wersjach podany końcu książki: jest wspaniały, pobrzmiewa Tennysonem, zupełnie inny od wierszy Tolkiena, z którymi mieliśmy do czynienia.

_________________
Friends help you move. Real friends help you move bodies.
Powrót do góry
 
 
Lomendil
Strażnik Północy


Dołączył(a): 17 Cze 2006
Wpisy: 776

Nieobecny(a): in tenebris

Wysłany: 10-06-2014 11:38    Temat wpisu: Odpowiedz z cytatem Szukaj na forum

O książce można już przeczytać na Wikipedii: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beowulf:_A_Translation_and_Commentary
_________________
Friends help you move. Real friends help you move bodies.
Powrót do góry
 
 
Wyświetl wpisy z ostatnich:   
Napisz nowy temat   Odpowiedz do tematu    Forum tolkienowskie -> Tolkienistyka i Posttolkienistyka Wszystkie czasy w strefie CET (Europa)
Idź do strony 1, 2, 3  Następna

Temat: Beowulf - zamiast recenzji (Strona 1 z 3)

 
Skocz do:  
Nie możesz pisać nowych tematów
Nie możesz odpowiadać w tematach
Nie możesz zmieniać swoich wpisów
Nie możesz usuwać swoich wpisów
Nie możesz głosować w ankietach
Nie możesz dodawać załączników w tym dziale
Nie możesz ściągać plików w tym dziale

Powered by phpBB2
Copyright © tolkien.com.pl Wszystkie prawa zastrzeżone.