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Hobbiton  Pod Rozbrykanym Balrogiem


"Avallone zniknęła z ziemi, Aman został zabrany gdzieś daleko i nie można ich znaleźć w świecie dzisiejszych ciemności. Niegdyś wszakże były, a więc ciągle są w swej prawdziwej postaci, będąc częścią takiego świata, jaki został pierwotnie zaplanowany." Dunedainowie, Silmarillion


Temat: Pierwsza wersja Przedmowy do The Lord of the Rings (Strona 1 z 1)

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Sarnond
Weteran Bitwy Pięciu Armii


Dołączył(a): 01 Wrz 2003
Wpisy: 495
Skąd: Fornost Erain


Wysłany: 07-02-2005 01:17    Temat wpisu: Pierwsza wersja Przedmowy do The Lord of the Rings Odpowiedz z cytatem Szukaj na forum

Wyszperałem na necie tekst przedmowy (Foreword) do pierwszego wydania Władcy..., który to tekst Tolkien parę lat po pierwszym wydaniu powieści zarzucił na rzecz tego, który mamy w WP obecnie (Przedmowa do drugiego wydania) - we wszystkich językach, w których został wydany. Nie jest toto specjalnie szeroko dostępne, więc pomyślałem, że może ktoś będzie ciekawy i nie zaszkodzi wkleić to dla potomnych.

Foreword to the First Edition of The Lord of the Rings napisał(a):
This tale, which has grown to be almost a history of the great War of the Ring, is drawn for the most part from the memoirs of the renowned Hobbits, Bilbo and Frodo, as they are preserved in the Red Book of Westmarch. This chief monument of Hobbit-lore is so called because it was compiled, repeatedly copied, and enlarged and handed down in the family of the Fairbairns of Westmarch, descended from that Master Samwise of whom this tale has much to say.

I have supplemented the account of the Red Book, in places, with information derived from the surviving records of Gondor, notably the Book of the Kings; but in general, though I have omitted much, I have in this tale adhered more closely to the actual words and narrative of my original than in the previous selection from the Red Book, The Hobbit. That was drawn from the early chapters, com- posed originally by Bilbo himself. If 'composed' is a just word. Bilbo was not assiduous, nor an orderly narrator, and his account is involved and discursive, and sometimes confused: faults that still appear in the Red Book, since the copiers were pious and careful, and altered very little.

The tale has been put into its present form in response to the many requests that I have received for further information about the history of the Third Age, and about Hobbits in particular. But since my children and others of their age, who first heard of the finding of the Ring, have grown older with the years, this book speaks more plainly of those darker things which lurked only on the borders of the earlier tale, but which have troubled Middle-earth in all its history. It is, in fact, not a book written for children at all; though many children will, of course, be interested in it, or parts of it, as they still are in the histories and legends of other times (especially in those not specially written for them).

I dedicate the book to all admirers of Bilbo, but especially to my sons and my daughter, and to my friends the Inklings. To the Inklings, because they have already listened to it with a patience, and indeed with an interest, that almost leads me to suspect that they have hobbit-blood in their venerable ancestry. To my sons and my daughter for the same reason, and also because they have all helped me in the labours of composition. If 'composition' is a just word, and these pages do not deserve all that I have said about Bilbo's work. For if the labour has been long (more than fourteen years), it has been neither orderly nor continuous. But I have not had Bilbo's leisure. Indeed much of that time has contained for me no leisure at all, and more than once for a whole year the dust has gathered on my unfinished pages. I only say this to explain to those who have waited for this book why they have had to wait so long. I have no reason to complain. I am surprised and delighted to find from numerous letters that so many people, both in England and across the Water, share my interest in this almost forgotten history; but it is not yet universally recognized as an important branch of study. It has indeed no obvious practical use, and those who go in for it can hardly expect to be assisted.

Much information, necessary and unnecessary, will be found in the Prologue. To complete it some maps are given, including one of the Shire that has been approved as reasonably correct by those Hobbits that still concern themselves with ancient history. At the end of the third volume will be found also some abridged family-trees There is also an index of names and strange words; and a table of days and dates. For those who are curious and like such lore some account is given in an appendix of the languages, the alphabets, and the calendars that were used in the Westlands in the Third Age of Middle-earth. But such lore is not necessary, and those who do not need it, or desire it, may neglect it, and even the names they may pro- nounce as they will. Some care has been given to the translation of their spelling from the original alphabets, and some notes on the sounds that are intended are offered. But not all are interested in such matters, and many who are not may still find the account of these great and valiant deeds worth the reading. It was in that hope that this long labour was undertaken; for it has required several years to translate, select, and arrange the matter of the Red Book of Westmarch in the form in which it is now presented to Men of a later Age, one no less darkling and ominous than were the great years 1418 and 1419 of the Shire long ago.

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"... gdybyś wtedy tutaj był i Wojny ujrzał twarz, z bólu wraz z Maglorem wył, z Cirdanem pełnił straż...
... gdybyś wtedy tutaj był w ciemności wielkiej stał, gdy wściekłości wąż się wił, i łkał głos przelanej krwi..."
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Eddie
Mieszkaniec Shire


Dołączył(a): 09 Maj 2013
Wpisy: 10



Wysłany: 19-10-2013 16:00    Temat wpisu: Odpowiedz z cytatem Szukaj na forum

Oooo... Super, że ktoś wkleił. Uśmiech Dziękuję. Uśmiech
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Temat: Pierwsza wersja Przedmowy do The Lord of the Rings (Strona 1 z 1)

 
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